USS Benjamin Stoddert DDG-22 & USS Jupiter AVS-8 Association
Saved Junk
 

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And the winner is...me!

Really, Lou Turilli 68-69 

 

1st registration in for Reno reunion!

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click here for latest newsletter

ISO...Lt. McLean who was in charge of ships store and missed ships movement in Hong Kong because of typhoon. 
email carolebryan.ddg22@msn.com with any info 

 

  


Thank you, Providence!
You were delightful and fun!

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On to Reno, Nevada 2019!

2019 FIFTY/FIFTY DRAWING
webassets/Cartoon_of_a_Man_Winning_a_Jackpot_clipart_image.jpgOur annual 50-50 drawing is the biggest fundraiser that we have to support the organization.  Every penny that we collect is added up and split right down the middle. Half goes to offset  Association reunion costs and the other half is split between 3 lucky sailors. You do not have to be present at the reunion to play or win.  If your name is drawn as one of our lucky sailors, we will mail you a check. 

Remember, the drawing is always open to everyone, regardless of whether or not you attend the reunion.
 Here is a chance to cash in on some big bucks. The more we sell, the bigger the prizes!  Ticket sales for the 50-50 will continue until just before the drawing.

Help support our growing Reunion Association.

Gentlemen, I had the honor to be Assistant CIC officer and then First Lieutenant of the World's Finest Destroyer in 1968-69. The commanding officer, CDR E. B. Taylor Jr. asked me to make up a card he'd sign for those individuals who rode the bosun's chair on a highline transfer at sea between our ship and another alongside. This is the card I designed. As I recall a tender printed up a thousand so there should have been enough for the rest of the ship's long and distinguished service.

This is a scan of my card, signed by CDR C. E. Gurney III, for riding the highline to & from USS Gurke in the Sea of Japan. It was a thrilling experience. BM1s Pokorny and Gravatt were leading petty officers of the ship's First Division that manned the highline and I'm proud to recall the men's coordinated strength didn't allow their young division officer get dunked.

I have other photos of the ship and her people I'll gladly send if you're interested. Thanks for your good work for the DDG-22 association and all the sailors who proudly served in the World's Finest Destroyer.

Very Respectfully

James M. ("JimMike") Steussy
LCDR, USN (ret.)
Vienna VA

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A living United States Flag is formed by 10,000 Navy sailors in Illinois, 1917

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U.S.S. BENJAMIN  STODDERT  DDG-22

USS JUPITER  AK-43 / AVS-8

 
ASSOCIATION BOARD OF OFFICERS

 July 31, 2018;


 

This letter shall serve as a NOTICE of Election Results for the DDG-22 / AVS-8 Association.
The following were placed into Office as they were all nominated and ran unopposed:

 


PRESIDENT - Ron Zorn              VICE PRESIDENT - Mike Rigdon


TREASURER - John Dishaw        SECRETARY - Dave Saunders



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Thank you Christopher Markley, It's the Sweat's birthday!!! 
Let's get your day started with a fact about your Navy. Today in 1963, USS Benjamin Stoddert (DDG 22) was launched. Can we get a like for this veteran of the Vietnam War? See more photos and learn more from the Naval History & Heritage Command at http://ow.ly/gDd9n.
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 On Jan. 8, 1963, destroyer Benjamin Stoddert (DDG 22) launches. A veteran of the Vietnam War, she is decommissioned in Dec. 1991. Transferred to the Maritime Administration in Sept. 1995, she sinks on Feb. 3, 2001 while under tow from California to Brownsville, Texas, for scrapping.

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click here to view Association News Spring 2017

 



VIETNAMESE IMMIGRANT

It looks like we did some good after all! On Saturday, July 24th, 2010 the town of Prescott Valley, AZ, hosted a Freedom Rally. Quang Nguyen was asked to speak on his experience of coming to America and what it means. He spoke the following in dedication to all Vietnam Veterans. Thought you might enjoy hearing what he had to say:Quote:

"35 years ago, if you were to tell me that I am going to stand up here speaking to a couple thousand patriots, in English, I'd laugh at you. Man, every morning I wake up thanking God for putting me and my family in the greatest country on earth. I just want you all to know that the American dream does exist and I am living the American dream. I was asked to speak to you about my experience as a first generation Vietnamese-American, but I'd rather speak to you as an American.


If you hadn't noticed, I am not white and I feel pretty comfortable with my people. I am a proud U.S. citizen and here is my proof. It took me 8 years to get it, waiting in endless lines, but I got it, and I am very proud of it.


I still remember the images of the Tet offensive in 1968, I was six years old. Now you might want to question how a 6-year-old boy could remember anything. Trust me, those images can never be erased. I can't even imagine what it was like for young American soldiers, 10,000 miles away from home, fighting on my behalf.


35 years ago, I left South Vietnam for political asylum. The war had ended. At the age of 13, I left with the understanding that I may or may not ever get to see my siblings or parents again. I was one of the first lucky 100,000 Vietnamese allowed to come to the U.S. Somehow, my family and I were reunited 5 months later, amazingly, in California. It was a miracle from God.


If you haven't heard lately that this is the greatest country on earth, I am telling you that right now. It was the freedom and the opportunities presented to me that put me here with all of you tonight. I also remember the barriers that I had to overcome every step of the way. My high school counselor told me that I cannot make it to college due to my poor communication skills. I proved him wrong. I finished college. You see, all you have to do is to give this little boy an opportunity and encourage him to take and run with it. Well, I took the opportunity and here I am.


This person standing tonight in front of you could not exist under a socialist/communist environment. By the way, if you think socialism is the way to go, I am sure many people here will chip in to get you a one-way ticket out of here. And if you didn't know, the only difference between socialism and communism is an AK-47 aimed at your head. That was my experience.In 1982, I stood with a thousand new immigrants, reciting the Pledge of Allegiance and listening to the National Anthem for the first time as an American. To this day, I can't remember anything sweeter and more patriotic than that moment in my life.Fast forwarding, somehow I finished high school, finished college, and like any other goofball 21 year old kid, I was having a great time with my life. I had a nice job and a nice apartment in Southern California. In some way and somehow, I had forgotten how I got here and why I was here.


One day I was at a gas station, I saw a veteran pumping gas on the other side of the island. I don't know what made me do it, but I walked over and asked if he had served in Vietnam. He smiled and said yes. I shook and held his hand. The grown man began to well up. I walked away as fast as I could and at that very moment, I was emotionally rocked. This was a profound moment in my life. I knew something had to change in my life. It was time for me to learn how to be a good citizen. It was time for me to give back.


You see, America is not just a place on the map, it isn't just a physical location. It is an ideal, a concept. And if you are an American, you must understand the concept, you must accept this concept, and most importantly, you have to fight and defend this concept. This is about Freedom and not free stuff. And that is why I am standing up here.


Brothers and sisters, to be a real American, the very least you must do is to learn English and understand it well. In my humble opinion, you cannot be a faithful patriotic citizen if you can't speak the language of the country you live in. Take this document of 46 pages - last I looked on the Internet, there wasn't a Vietnamese translation of the U.S. Constitution. It took me a long time to get to the point of being able to converse and until this day, I still struggle to come up with the right words. It's not easy, but if it's too easy, it's not worth doing.


Before I knew this 46-page document, I learned of the 500,000 Americans who fought for this little boy. I learned of the 58,000 names scribed on the black wall at the Vietnam Memorial. You are my heroes. You are my founders.


At this time, I would like to ask all the Vietnam veterans to please stand. I thank you for my life. I thank you for your sacrifices, and I thank you for giving me the freedom and liberty I have today. I now ask all veterans, firefighters, and police officers, to please stand. On behalf of all first generation immigrants, I thank you for your services and may God bless you all."


Quang Nguyen

Creative Director/Founder

Caddis Advertising, LLC"God Bless America ""One Flag, One Language, One Nation Under God"


For those who understand, no explanation is needed. For those who do not understand, no explanation is possible.


 

 

Notes from Sailors
Subject: War in our Wake

Dear Carol,
I was a RM3 during the Westpac 74-75 and the evacuation of Nam. My wife came across the book last Dec and I got my copy Jan 2nd. I requested to join the FB group, to post about the book, but seen where you had already put the word out there.
I just wanted to back you up - it is a real good read. I recommend it to any one that served on the Stoddert at anytime and to those during operation frequent wind, operation baby lift and operation eagle pull, which we participated in all three. I feel Jon did a really good job on the book. Before the evacuation, I was in-country as a Marine (69-70) and after, I was on a ship that got involved with "boat people" during 3 Westpac's. it is interesting that part of my life stretched over so many years and still "pops" up!
Can you update your roster with my gmail address.

Thank you
RM3 Robert Swindler Westpac 74-75

 

 

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DEDICATED TO HUGH FLEET


Hugh served in the Navy from 1965 to October 1968. He did three months of boot camp at Great Lakes, Illinois. From there he went home to Minneapolis, Minnesota, for a week before heading to Whidbey Island, Washington, for one year. He met Madelaine during his time there.


 


Hugh served on the Benjamin Stoddert out of Honolulu, Hawaii, from 1966 to 1968. He remembers being seasick the first time out and then again when they pulled into the


Philippine's after waiting out a typhoon that was traveling about 70 miles an hour. At one time, while on the bridge, the officer in charge played a trick on him. He had Hugh go onto the bow and plug in a sound- powered phone and look for the mail buoy. He thought that was funny.


 


While in Vietnam there was a change of command on ship captains. Captain Kint had Commander Taylor transferred on board by helicopter. Hugh had helicopter duty. This meant he had to stand aft on 01 Level on top of the surface-to-air missile launcher with the red/green paddle and sound the powered phones.


Hugh waited to give the green paddle, so the helicopter could hover and lower Commander Taylor. As he was being lowered, Hugh told the bridge that Command Taylor looked like Lee Marvin and that story remains today.


 


While Hugh and his wife were stationed in Honolulu, Hawaii, Hugh confiscated some sea dye from the ship and put it in a fountain in a park they used to walk to. Of course, it turned the fountain water green and was quite the spectacle with the other visitors to the park. Lots of wows from the onlookers!


 


Madelaine recalls the ship had a family evening allowing them to come on board for a movie and snacks. The movie had grown men riding those little wooden horses that children play with. What a shock to the guests and embarrassment to the sailors! Five minutes was all the families could handle of that movie.


 


Hugh remembers several people on board. One was Guyman who was transferred to swift boat duty and was killed in Vietnam. Another one was Whirley but he could never find out what happened to him.


Mokland visited Hugh and Madelaine after being discharged. Of course, there was Ron Zorn. Ron was always down in the boiler room, so he never got any of the good stories about him. Wayne Ellington was the Quarter Master who was usually on the bridge with Hugh. He remembers them sending him down to the galley during midnight watch for fresh baked bread and butter. You could smell it all over the ship!


 


Hugh was awarded a citation for "Outstanding Performance of Duty while attached to and serving on the USS Benjamin Stoddert (DDG-22) from April 13 to September 1, 1967, during combat operations against the enemy. Seaman Fleet acted as a lookout for a period of 720 hours while the ship was involved in Sea Dragon Operations off the coast of North Vietnam. Exposed to hostile fire on several occasions, Seaman Fleet's skillful detection of the source of the gunfire enabled the ship to rapidly take evasive action and return fire. Seaman Fleet's skill and judgment contributed significantly and directly to the successful


accomplishment of the ship's mission and to the United States effort in Vietnam," signed by the Vice Admiral John Hyland.


 


Photo  Album  Link: http://www.smilebox.com/playBlog/4e4455324d7a4d314f54413d0d0a&blogview=true

 

In September of 2005, on the first day of school, Martha Cothren, a History teacher at Robinson High School in Little Rock, AR, did something not to be forgotten. On the first day of school, with the permission of the school superintendent, the principal, and the building supervisor, she removed all of the desks in her classroom.  When the first period kids entered the room they discovered that there were no desks.

 

'Ms. Cothren, where are our desks?'

 

She replied, 'You can't have a desk until you tell me how you earn the right to sit at a desk.'

 

They thought, 'Well, maybe it's our grades.'  'No,' she said.

 

'Maybe it's our behavior.'  She told them, 'No, it's not even your behavior.'

 

And so, they came and went, the first period, second period, third period.  Still no desks in the classroom.  Kids called their parents to tell them what was happening and by early afternoon television news crews had started gathering at the school to report about this crazy teacher who had taken all the desks out of her room.

 

The final period of the day came and as the puzzled students found seats on the floor of the desk-less classroom.  Martha Cothren said, 'Throughout the day no one has been able to tell me just what he or she has done to earn the right to sit at the desks that are ordinarily found in this classroom.  Now I am going to tell you.'

 

At this point, Martha Cothren went over to the door of her classroom and opened it.  Twenty-seven (27) U.S. Veterans, all in uniform, walked into that classroom, each one carrying a school desk. The Vets began placing the school desks in rows, and then they would walk over and stand alongside the wall.  By the time the last soldier had set the final desk in place those kids started to understand, perhaps for the first time in their lives, just how the right to sit at those desks had been earned.

 

Martha said, 'You didn't earn the right to sit at these desks. These heroes did it for you.  They placed the desks here for you.  They went halfway around the world, giving up their education and interrupting their careers and families so you could have the freedom you have.  Now, it's up to you to sit in them.  It is your responsibility to learn, to be good students, to be good citizens.  They paid the price so that you could have the freedom to get an education.  Don't ever forget it.'

 

By the way, this is a true story.  And this teacher was awarded the Veterans of Foreign Wars Teacher of the Year for the State of Arkansas in 2006.  She is the daughter of a WWII POW.

 

 

Let us always remember the men and women of our military and the rights they have won for us.

2017 50-50 drawing
Tucson, AZ, September 20-23, 2017
Even if you can't make it, you can be there in spirit and join in the fun.  
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 Our annual 50-50 drawing is the biggest fundraiser that we have to support the organization.  Every penny that we collect is added up and split right down the middle. Half goes to offset Association costs and the other half is split between 3 lucky sailors. You do not have to be present at the reunion to play or win.  If your name is drawn as one of our lucky sailors, we will mail you a check.
Here is a chance to cash in on some big bucks. The more we sell, the bigger the prizes!  Ticket sales for the 50-50 will continue until just before the drawing, which will be at the Friday evening banquet.
Send your check; $10.00 for each 12 tickets along with some of those pesky return address labels that regularly appear in your mailbox.
Our treasurer will take care of the funds and will even stick the address labels on the tickets. 
Make your checks payable to USS Benjamin Stoddert Association and mail to:

John Dishaw
3035 Charlotte Street
Newbury Park, CA 91320
or

Click below, choose your tickets and pay with PayPal...we will generate your tickets on the computer and send you an email copy.
Remember, the drawing is always open to everyone, regardless of whether or not you attend the reunion.   
 click the link below, it will take you to the "Sweat Shop", click 50-50 and choose your ticket options and pay with PayPal

50-50

 

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A note from Mac McCandless 

In Memoriam

 

Tom Sindorf

8 May, 1937 - 3 November, 2015

Our shipmate, Tom Sindorf, passed on 3 November, 2015 in Lake Havasu City, Arizona.

 

Tom's navy career began when he enlisted on 28 February, 1957.  After completing boot camp and fire control A school, he reported aboard USS ALAMO (LSD 33), home-ported in San Diego.   While aboard ALAMO, Tom qualified for the NESEP (Navy Enlisted Science and Engineering Program) program.

 

After graduating from the University of Nebraska with a BSME degree and Officer Candidate School, Tom reported to USS DALE (DLG 19) which was under construction at New York Shipbuilding in Camden, New Jersey.  As a plank owner, Tom served aboard the San Diego based DALE until he received orders to BENJAMIN STODDERT.

 

Tom served as the Fire Control Officer on BENJAMIN STODDERT until he surprised his shipmates by announcing his decision to leave active duty.  Tom departed BENJAMN STODDERT during her 1967 WESTPAC cruise, and he was released from active duty in San Francisco on 26 June, 1967.  According to his DD214, he served 10 years, 4 months, and 6 days.

Favorite Reunion
 
 
 
 
 
 
Comments:  Favorite Memories

New reunion destination survey!

Everyone welcome to weigh in! 

Where would you like to see as a reunion destination?
Why?  What should we see there?
Your Name
 * required
Ship Name
Years aboard ship (i.e. 75-59)
 * required
Email Address
 * required
 
 

Click here for an awesome Christmas Card.

 

Ahoy mates,
This message is directed to the Radar gang, OI Div aboard the Benjamin Stoddert 65-68….I found only 4 of you so far. 
One of your shipmates, Tom Yeager (RD-3) was involved in a motorcycle accident and received major injuries about a month ago. He has had a difficult recovery, just beginning to communicate and is in danger of blood clots that could cause a stroke or worse. He has a very long way to go.
Tom and his wife had planned to attend the ship’s reunion in Hawaii this September.  I just received a call from her yesterday with the news and had to cancel.
This message is intended to let those who remember him to please keep him in prayer.
If you would like to communicate or send a card you can contact me and I will get it to the family.
The Benjamin Stoddert was a great ship with an awesome crew. Our annual ships reunion is a good time to revisit old friendships and make new ones. I met Tom and his wife at one of our reunions in Jacksonville and will miss them this year but hope to see them again next year in Nashville.
Call or email if you have any questions.
Sincerely yours,
John Dishaw 65-68
805-480-4038 

 

 Messages from the crew
Sorry , I won't be there ( 65-67) ,
I've planning a trip back to 
Australia during that time of
the Ships Reunion ! Please 
keep me updated for future 
events , My God Bless the 
Benny Sweat (GQ-22)
Former ( SK-3) Duane
Baumgartner !
Give my best to the rest 
of the crew that remembers
me ! 

I received this message from Frank and Mary Chesla this morning:

Our best wishes to all our Stoddert shipmates from Mary and I.
We will miss not being there this year, our thoughts will be with all.
Have a great time!
Frank and Mary
Waiting to see everyone

Dave Behrend
Wisconsin

Happy dancing!  We reached 100 swabbies in our little association this morning!

Thanks for your support!

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Benefits of Association Membership

Full pass worded access to website

 Member Directory

Hard copy newsletters

 Free entries into Reunion door prize drawing

Discount at Ship Store
Join now only $20.00/yr

Click here to support your Association

 

The U. S. S.. Constitution (Old Ironsides), as a combat vessel, carried 48,600 gallons of fresh water
for her crew of 475 officers and men. This was sufficient to last six months of sustained operations
at sea. She carried no evaporators (i.e. fresh water distillers).

However, let it be noted that according to her ship's log, "On July 27, 1798, the U.S.S.
Constitution sailed from Boston with a full complement of 475 officers and men, 48,600 gallons
of fresh water, 7,400 cannon shot, 11,600 pounds of black powder and
79,400 gallons of rum."

Her mission: "To destroy and harass English shipping."

Making Jamaica on 6 October, she took on 826 pounds of flour and 68,300 gallons of rum.

Then she headed for the Azores , arriving there 12 November.. She provisioned with
550 pounds of beef and 64,300 gallons of Portuguese wine.

On 18 November, she set sail for England . In the ensuing days she defeated five British
men-of-war and captured and scuttled 12 English merchant ships,salvaging only the rum
aboard each.

By 26 January, her powder and shot were exhausted. Nevertheless, although unarmed she
made a night raid up the Firth of Clyde in Scotland . Her landing party captured a whisky distillery and transferred
40,000 gallons of single malt Scotch aboard by dawn. Then she headed home.

The U. S. S. Constitution arrived in Boston on 20 February 1799, with no cannon shot, no food, no powder,
no rum, no wine, no whisky, and 38,600 gallons of water.

GO NAVY!

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We're home and a great time was had by all!

Thank you, Jacksonville, Florida, what a great city!

reunion photos and updates coming all week

photos are showing up on the Facebook page

September 28-October 2, 2011

Do you feel lucky? 


 

Even if you are not joining us in Jacksonville, there is still a way to play and be part of the fun!  While it is too late to mail to California and enter the drawing, if you use the PayPal option to purchase your chances we will make sure that they get into the hopper for Saturday night October 1.

 

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 For those of you planning on attending the reunion in Jacksonville, airport transportation to the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Jacksonville via Express Shuttle
needs to be arranged no later than 48 hours prior to your arrival to get the $20.00 per person rate. Click below to download a copy of the shuttle form which
can be emailed, or you can call direct using the phone # provided at the top of the form. The hotel is 30 miles from the airport and this is the most economical
transportation provided.
Last minute reservations and/or transportation requests will be charged the rate of $25.00 per person each way.
The form is in .doc format. You can fill it out, save to your computer and attach it to an email to reservations@destinationplanning.com.
You will receive email confirmation.

click here for airport transportation form

 


Interesting article, thanks, Rich P.  

I know I needed this reminder, since Sears isn't always my first choice. It's amazing when you think of how long the war has lasted and Sears hasn't withdrawn from their commitment. Could we each buy at least one thing at Sears this year? 

How does Sears treat its employees who are called up for military duty? By law, they are required to hold their jobs open and available, but nothing more. Usually, people take a big pay cut and lose benefits as a result of being called up for active duty. 

Sears is voluntarily paying the difference in salaries and maintaining all benefits, including medical insurance and bonus programs, for all called up reservist employees for up to two years. 

I submit that Sears is an exemplary corporate citizen and should be recognized for its contribution. I suggest we all shop at Sears at least once, and be sure to find a manager to tell them why we are there so the company gets the positive reinforcement & feedback it well deserves. 

Pass it on. 

I decided to check this before I sent it forward. So I sent the following e-mail to the Sears Customer Service Department: 

I received this e-mail and I would like to know if it is true. If it is, the internet may have just become one very good source of advertisement for your company. I know I would go out of my way to buy products from Sears instead of another store for a like item, even if it's cheaper at that store. 

This is their answer to my e-mail: 

Dear Customer: 

Thank you for contacting Sears. The information is factual. We appreciate your positive feedback. 

Sears regards service to our country as one of greatest sacrifices our young men and women can make. We are happy to do our part to lessen the burden they bear at this time. 

Bill Thorn 
Sears Cu stomer Care 
webcenter@sears.com 
1-800-349-4358 

Please pass this on to all your friends. Sears needs to be recognized for this outstanding contribution and we need to show them as Americans, we do appreciate what they are doing for our military!!! 

It's verified ! By 
Snopes.com at: 


http://www.snopes.com/politics/military/sears.asp


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XEROX IS DOING SOMETHING COOL

If you go to this web site, www.LetsSayThanks.com you can pick out a thank you card and Xerox will print it and it will be sent to a soldier that is serving overseas.  You can't pick out who gets it, but it will go to a member of the armed services.


How AMAZING it would be if we could get everyone we know to send one!!! It is FREE and it only takes a second.


Wouldn't it be wonderful if the soldiers received a bunch of these? Whether you are for or against the war, our soldiers over there need to know we are behind them.


Please take the time and please take the time to pass it on for others to do. We can never say enough thank you's.


Thanks for taking to time to support our military!  

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Rapid City, South Dakota
October 14-18, 2009
Thank you to the staff at the Rapid City Quality Inn
1902 LaCrosse St.
Rapid City, SD  55701
605 342-3322
for a memorable reunion

BRING IT ON!

RING IT IN!

WELCOME 2010!

Ringing Bells

A vet on FPN posted these:

And now for some military humor, courtesy of a retired bomber pilot who has literate friends.


"A slipping gear could let your M203 grenade launcher fire when you least expect it. That would make you quite unpopular in what's left of your unit." - Army's magazine of preventive maintenance


"Aim towards the Enemy." - Instruction printed on US Rocket Launcher
 

"When the pin is pulled, Mr. Grenade is not our friend." - US Marine Corps 

"Cluster bombing from B-52s are very, very accurate. The bombs are guaranteed to always hit the ground." USAF Ammo Troop


"If the enemy is in range, so are you." - Infantry Journal
 

"It is generally inadvisable to eject directly over the area you just bombed.."  US Air Force Manual


"Try to look unimportant; they may be low on ammo." - Infantry Journal


"You, you, and you ... Panic. The rest of you, come with me." - US Marine Corp Gunnery Sgt.


"Tracers work both ways." - US Army Ordnance


"Five second fuses only last three seconds." - Infantry Journal

Bravery is being the only one who knows you're afraid." - David Hackworth


"If your attack is going too well, you're walking into an ambush." - Infantry Journal


"Any ship can be a minesweeper... once." - Anonymous


"Never tell the Platoon Sergeant you have nothing to do." - Unknown Marine Recruit


"Don't draw fire; it irritates the people around you." - Your Buddies


"If you see a bomb technician running, follow him." - USAF Ammo Troop


"You've never been lost until you've been lost at Mach 3." - Paul F. Crickmore (test pilot)


"The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire."  "Blue water Navy truism:


There are more planes in the ocean than submarines in the sky."   From an old carrier sailor


"If the wings are traveling faster than the fuselage, it's probably a helicopter -- and therefore,
unsafe."


"When one engine fails on a twin-engine airplane you always have enough power left to get you to the scene of the crash."


"Never trade luck for skill."


"Mankind has a perfect record in aviation; we never left one up there!"


"Flashlights are tubular metal containers kept in a flight bag for the purpose of storing dead batteries.


"Flying the airplane is more important than radioing your plight to a person on the ground incapable of understanding or doing anything about it."


Advice given to RAF pilots during WWII: "When a prang (crash) seems inevitable, endeavor to strike the softest, cheapest object in the vicinity as slow and gently as possible."


"The Piper Cub is the safest airplane in the world; it can just barely kill you." - Attributed to Max Stanley (Northrop test pilot)


"Never fly in the same cockpit with someone braver than you."


"There is no reason to fly through a thunderstorm in peacetime." - Sign over squadron ops desk at Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ,


"If something hasn't broken on your helicopter, it's about to."


Basic Flying Rules: "Try to stay in the middle of the air. Do not go near the edges of it. The edges of the air can be recognized by the appearance of ground, buildings, sea, trees and interstellar space. It is much more difficult to fly there."


As the test pilot climbs out of the experimental aircraft, having torn off the wings and tail in the crash landing, the crash truck arrives, the rescuer sees a bloodied pilot and asks "What happened?". The pilot's reply: "I don't know, I just got here myself!" - Attributed to Ray Crandell (Lockheed test pilot)

Thank you to those members who have paid their Association dues

 
Art Hansen 72-76
Clifton Brothers 84-86
Milford Jarvis 65-69
Johnnie Richard 64-66
Tom Sindorf 66-67
Frank Chesla 63-66
Bill Newquist
Harvey Rowe 64-67
Bill Moore 64-68
Mac McCandless 65-67
Jim Hinton 67-70
Ted Waypa 66-69
Walt Welsh 64-66
John Dishaw 65-68
John Bassolino 65-68
Herm Chambers 66-68
Lou Turilli 68-69
Dave Saunders 63-69
Carole Bryan (family)
Michael Lassiter
Hugh Fleet 66-68
Leo Biodrowski 71-75
Bill Christensen 75-79
Chuck Griffis 72-75
Dave Behrend 71-74
Marc Jacob 74-81
Association membership to be effective 1/1/2008:

ussstoddert.gif

Welcome New Association Members
George Maxwell 72-74
Loren Morse 69-73
Larry Icenogle 71-73
Michael Hutton 83-87
David Nicholson 63-65








A.L. Heisig 67-70
B.J. Bower-Hansen (family)
Clifton Jensen 71-74
Danilo Concepcion 73-75
David Frye 72-75
Rich Palazzo 71-72
Robert Beard 67-70
Robert Kohut 71-74
Harry Dunleavy 67-69
Steve McPhillips 69-71

Bert Cassels 64-65
Wayne Ellington 65-67
Michael Hoffman 68-71
Kenneth O'Brien  67-70
Richard LaFountaine 74-76
John Forsyth 67-68


NEW MEMBERS

Thanking you for the support of our Association

Bert Cassels 64-65
Richard LaFountaine 74-76
John Forsyth 67-68
Tom Carroll 67-70
David Link 67-69
Jimmie Leapley 66-69
Ed Denk 66-69
Jay Jansson 70-73
Keith MacFadyen 64-67
Robert Bader 74-76
Walter Meginniss 64-65
Ken Ogawa 71-73
Garry Nichols 76-84
Dennis Benson 77-80
Lee Rahn 64-65
Roger Davis (with apologies)



 


45801839_10217495443048281_4309989541118214144_o.jpg

*988 names on master list

484 active email addresses

87 mailing addresses with no email

*55 Paid Association Members
(*notates changed numbers)

A Great Idea
When you are making out your Christmas card list this year,
please include the following:
A Recovering American Soldier/Sailor/Airman
c/o Walter Reed Army Medical Center
6900 Georgia Ave. NW
Washington D.C. 20307-5001

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Happy Thanksgiving! 
We are thankful for you all!

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50-50 Drawing
We all know how near and dear the 50-50 drawing is to Herm Chambers.  Half of the money goes to defray expenses for the Association and half of the money is the Grand Prize at our banquet.  Since we are trying to go all electronic, tickets will not be mailed out in advance.  To support this cause please mail $10.00 for every 12 tickets that you would like to purchase and include enough address labels for each ticket.  Remember, you do not have to attend the reunions to support your organization or even to win.

Mail to:    Herman Chambers
               USS Benjamin Stoddert Association
               220 Meister Way
               Sacramento, CA  95819
               
DDG22ETCM@yahoo.com

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 Happy Valentines Day!

Our Wishes for You in 2009

May peace break into your house and may thieves come to steal your debts. May the pockets of your jeans become a magnet of $100 bills. May love stick to your face like Vaseline and may laughter assault your lips! May your clothes smell of success like smoking tires and may happiness slap you across the face and may your tears be that of joy. May the problems you had forget your home address!

In simple words . . . May 2009 be the best year of your life!!!  

 2009 drink 

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6 Boys, 13 Hands
Choose a picture from the Gallery



Six Boys and Thirteen Hands

Author unknown


Each year I go to Washington, DC, with the eighth grade class from 
Clinton, WI where I grew up, to videotape their trip. I greatly enjoy visiting 
our nation's capitol, and each year I take some special memories back with  
me.
This fall's trip was especially memorable.

On the last night of our trip, we stopped at the Iwo Jima memorial.

This memorial is the largest bronze statue in the world and depicts 
one of the most famous photographs in history -- that of the six brave soldiers
raising the American Flag at the top of a rocky hill on the island of 
Iwo Jima, Japan, during WW II.

Over one hundred students and chaperones piled off the buses and headed
towards the memorial. I noticed a solitary figure at the base of the 
statue, and as I got closer he asked, "Where are you guys from?"

I told him that we were from Wisconsin "Hey, I'm a cheese head, too!
Come gather around, Cheese heads, and I will tell you a story."

(James Bradley just happened to be in Washington, DC, to speak at the
memorial the following day. He was there that night to say good night 
to his dad, who had passed away. He was just about to leave when he saw the 
buses pull up. I videotaped him as he spoke to us, and received his 
permission to share what he said from my videotape. It is one thing to tour the 
incredible monuments filled with history in Washington, D.C., but it is quite 
another to get the kind of insight we received that night.)

When all had gathered around, he reverently began to speak. (Here are 
his words that night.)

"My name is James Bradley and I'm from Antigo, Wisconsin. My Dad is on  
that statue. I just wrote a book called "Flags of Our Fathers". It is the 
story of the six boys you see behind me.

"Six boys raised the flag. The first guy putting the pole in the 
ground is Harlon Block. Harlon was an all-state football player. He enlisted in 
the Marine Corps with all the senior members of his football team. They 
were off to play another type of game. A game called "War." But it didn't turn 
out to be a game. Harlon, at the age of 21, died with his intestines in his 
hands. I don't say that to gross you out, I say that because there are people  
who stand in front of this statue and talk about the glory of war. You 
guys need to know that most of the boys in Iwo Jima were 17, 18, and 19 years 
old - and it was so hard that the ones who did make it home never even would  
talk to their families about it.


(He pointed to the statue) "You see this next guy? That's Rene Gagnon 
from
New Hampshire. If you took Rene's helmet off at the moment this photo 
was taken and looked in the webbing of that helmet, you would find a
photograph... a photograph of his girlfriend. Rene put that in there for
protection because he was scared. He was 18 years old. It was just 
boys who won the battle of Iwo Jima. Boys. Not old men.

"The next guy here, the third guy in this tableau, was Sergeant Mike
Strank. Mike is my hero. He was the hero of all these guys. They 
called him the "old man" because he was so old. He was already 24. When Mike would
motivate his boys in training camp, he didn't say, 'Let's go kill some
Japanese' or 'Let's die for our country.' He knew he was talking to 
little boys. Instead he would say, 'You do what I say, and I'll get you home to
your mothers.'

"The last guy on this side of the statue is Ira Hayes, a Pima Indian 
from Arizona. Ira Hayes was one who walked off Iwo Jima. He went into the 
White House with my dad. President Truman told him, 'You're a hero.' He told
reporters, 'How can I feel like a hero when 250 of my buddies hit the 
island with me and only 27 of us walked off alive?' So you take your class at
school, 250 of you spending a year together having fun, doing everything
together.

Then all 250 of you hit the beach, but only 27 of your classmates walk  
off alive. That was Ira Hayes. He had images of horror in his mind. Ira 
Hayes carried the pain home with him and eventually died dead drunk, face 
down at the age of 32 (ten years after this picture was taken).


"The next guy, going around the statue, is Franklin Sousley from 
Hilltop, Kentucky. A fun-lovin' hillbilly boy. His best friend, who is now 70, 
told me, 'Yeah, you know, we took two cows up on the porch of the Hilltop 
General Store. Then we strung wire across the stairs so the cows couldn't get 
down. Then we fed them Epsom salts. Those cows crapped all night.' Yes, he 
was a fun-lovin' hillbilly boy. Franklin died on Iwo Jima at the age of 19. 
When the telegram came to tell his mother that he was dead, it went to the
Hilltop General Store. A barefoot boy ran that telegram up to his 
mother's farm.
The neighbors could hear her scream all night and into the morning. 
Those neighbors lived a quarter of a mile away.

"The next guy, as we continue to go around the statue, is my dad, John
Bradley from Antigo, Wisconsin where I was raised. My dad lived until
1994, but he would never give interviews. When Walter Cronkite's 
producers or the New York Times would call, we were trained as little kids to 
say "No, I'm sorry, sir, my dad's not here. He is in Canada fishing. No, there 
is no phone there, sir. No, we don't know when he is coming back." My dad 
never fished or even went to Canada. Usually, he was sitting there right at 
the table eating his Campbell's soup. But we had to tell the press that he  
was out fishing. He didn't want to talk to the press.

"You see, like Ira Hayes, my dad didn't see himself as a hero. Everyone
thinks these guys are heroes, 'cause they are in a photo and on a 
monument.
My dad knew better. He was a medic. John Bradley from Wisconsin was a
caregiver. In Iwo Jima he probably held over 200 boys as they died. 
And when boys died in Iwo Jima, they writhed and screamed, without any 
medication or help with the pain.


"When I was a little boy, my third grade teacher told me that my
dad was a hero. When I went home and told my dad that, he looked at me  
and said, 'I want you always to remember that the heroes of Iwo Jima are the
guys who did not come back. Did NOT come back.'

"So that's the story about six nice young boys. Three died on Iwo 
Jima, and three came back as national heroes. Overall, 7,000 boys died on Iwo 
Jima in the worst battle in the history of the Marine Corps. My voice is 
giving out, so I will end here. Thank you for your time."


Suddenly, the monument wasn't just a big old piece of metal with a flag
sticking out of the top. It came to life before our eyes with the 
heartfelt words of a son who did indeed have a father who was a hero. Maybe not 
a hero for the reasons most people would believe, but a hero nonetheless.

We need to remember that God created this vast and glorious world for 
us to live in, freely, but also at great sacrifice.

Let us never forget from the Revolutionary War to the current War on
Terrorism and all the wars in-between that sacrifice was made for our
freedom.

Remember to pray praises for this great country of ours and also pray 
for those still in murderous unrest around the world.

God Bless You and God Bless America

REMINDER: Everyday that you can wake up free, it's going to be a great  
day.

PS. One thing I learned while on tour with my 8th grade students in DC  
that is not mentioned here is that if you look at the statue very closely and
count the number of "hands" raising the flag, there are 13. When the 
man who made the statue was asked why there were 13, he simply said the 13th 
hand was the hand of God.

This week only: $10.00

iwojimamemorial1.jpg

6 Boys,13 Hands




Six Boys and Thirteen Hands

Author unknown

Each year I go to Washington, DC, with the eighth grade class from Clinton, WI where I grew up, to
videotape their trip. I greatly enjoy visiting our nation's capitol, and each year I take some special memories back with me.  This fall's trip was especially memorable.

On the last night of our trip, we stopped at the Iwo Jima memorial.

This memorial is the largest bronze statue in the world and depicts one of the most famous photographs in history -- that of the six brave soldiers raising the American Flag at the top of a rocky hill on the island of Iwo Jima, Japan, during WW II.

Over one hundred students and chaperones piled off the buses and headed towards the memorial. I noticed a solitary figure at the base of the statue, and as I got closer he asked, "Where are you guys from?"

I told him that we were from Wisconsin "Hey, I'm a cheese head, too!  Come gather around, Cheese heads, and I will tell you a story."

(James Bradley just happened to be in Washington, DC, to speak at the memorial the following day. He was there that night to say good night to his dad, who had passed away. He was just about to leave when he saw the buses pull up. I videotaped him as he spoke to us, and received his permission to share what he said from my videotape. It is one thing to tour the incredible monuments filled with history in Washington, D.C., but it is quite another to get the kind of insight we received that night.)

When all had gathered around, he reverently began to speak. (Here are his words that night.)

"My name is James Bradley and I'm from Antigo, Wisconsin. My Dad is on that statue. I just wrote a book called "Flags of Our Fathers". It is the story of the six boys you see behind me.

"Six boys raised the flag. The first guy putting the pole in the ground is Harlon Block. Harlon was an all-state football player. He enlisted in the Marine Corps with all the senior members of his football team. They were off to play another type of game. A game called "War." But it didn't turn out to be a game. Harlon, at the age of 21, died with his intestines in his hands. I don't say that to gross you out, I say that because there are people who stand in front of this statue and talk about the glory of war. You guys need to know that most of the boys in Iwo Jima were 17, 18, and 19 years old - and it was so hard that the ones who did make it home never even would talk to their families about it.


(He pointed to the statue) "You see this next guy? That's Rene Gagnon from New Hampshire. If you took Rene's helmet off at the moment this photo was taken and looked in the webbing of that helmet, you would find a photograph... a photograph of his girlfriend. Rene put that in there for protection because he was scared. He was 18 years old. It was just boys who won the battle of Iwo Jima. Boys. Not old men.

"The next guy here, the third guy in this tableau, was Sergeant Mike Strank. Mike is my hero. He was the hero of all these guys. They called him the "old man" because he was so old. He was already 24. When Mike would motivate his boys in training camp, he didn't say, 'Let's go kill some Japanese' or 'Let's die for our country.' He knew he was talking to little boys. Instead he would say, 'You do what I say, and I'll get you home to your mothers.'

"The last guy on this side of the statue is Ira Hayes, a Pima Indian from Arizona. Ira Hayes was one who walked off Iwo Jima. He went into the White House with my dad. President Truman told him, 'You're a hero.' He told reporters, 'How can I feel like a hero when 250 of my buddies hit the island with me and only 27 of us walked off alive?' So you take your class at school, 250 of you spending a year together having fun, doing everything together.

Then all 250 of you hit the beach, but only 27 of your classmates walk off alive. That was Ira Hayes. He had images of horror in his mind. Ira Hayes carried the pain home with him and eventually died dead drunk, face down at the age of 32 (ten years after this picture was taken).


"The next guy, going around the statue, is Franklin Sousley from Hilltop, Kentucky. A fun-lovin' hillbilly boy. His best friend, who is now 70, told me, 'Yeah, you know, we took two cows up on the porch of the Hilltop General Store. Then we strung wire across the stairs so the cows couldn't get down. Then we fed them Epsom salts. Those cows crapped all night.' Yes, he was a fun-lovin' hillbilly boy. Franklin died on Iwo Jima at the age of 19.  When the telegram came to tell his mother that he was dead, it went to the Hilltop General Store. A barefoot boy ran that telegram up to his mother's farm. The neighbors could hear her scream all night and into the morning.  Those neighbors lived a quarter of a mile away.

"The next guy, as we continue to go around the statue, is my dad, John Bradley from Antigo, Wisconsin where I was raised. My dad lived until 1994, but he would never give interviews. When Walter Cronkite's producers or the New York Times would call, we were trained as little kids to say "No, I'm sorry, sir, my dad's not here. He is in Canada fishing. No, there is no phone there, sir. No, we don't know when he is coming back." My dad never fished or even went to Canada. Usually, he was sitting there right at the table eating his Campbell's soup. But we had to tell the press that he was out fishing. He didn't want to talk to the press.

"You see, like Ira Hayes, my dad didn't see himself as a hero. Everyone thinks these guys are heroes, 'cause they are in a photo and on a monument.  My dad knew better. He was a medic. John Bradley from Wisconsin was a caregiver. In Iwo Jima he probably held over 200 boys as they died.  And when boys died in Iwo Jima, they writhed and screamed, without any medication or help with the pain.


"When I was a little boy, my third grade teacher told me that my dad was a hero. When I went home and told my dad that, he looked at me and said, 'I want you always to remember that the heroes of Iwo Jima are the guys who did not come back. Did NOT come back.'

"So that's the story about six nice young boys. Three died on Iwo Jima, and three came back as national heroes. Overall, 7,000 boys died on Iwo Jima in the worst battle in the history of the Marine Corps. My voice is giving out, so I will end here. Thank you for your time."


Suddenly, the monument wasn't just a big old piece of metal with a flag sticking out of the top. It came to life before our eyes with the heartfelt words of a son who did indeed have a father who was a hero. Maybe not a hero for the reasons most people would believe, but a hero nonetheless.

We need to remember that God created this vast and glorious world for us to live in, freely, but also at great sacrifice.

Let us never forget from the Revolutionary War to the current War on Terrorism and all the wars in-between that sacrifice was made for our freedom.

Remember to pray praises for this great country of ours and also pray for those still in murderous unrest around the world.

God Bless You and God Bless America

 Everyday that you can wake up free, it's going to be a great day.

PS. One thing I learned while on tour with my 8th grade students in DC that is not mentioned here is that if you look at the statue very closely and count the number of "hands" raising the flag, there are 13. When the man who made the statue was asked why there were 13, he simply said the 13th hand was the hand of God.

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California, We are Here!

October 13-17, 2010
Thank you to the
Best Western Hacienda Hotel
(what a beautiful facility!)
4041 Harney St.
San Diego, CA  92110
800 888-1991
(be sure to ask for USS Benjamin Stoddert Reunion rates) 

Quick news flashes!

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We have a new newsletter editor!  Joy Patz has allowed the Hansens to retire!  We have a new email address to submit suggestions and ideas for features in the newsletter.  Contact Joy at ddg22.news@gmail.com 

 

  • Thank you, Nashville!  You were warm and welcoming!  So many amazing things to see, so much good food and so little time!

  • 2016 Jacksonville, FL around Veterans Day.  The Adams Class ship/museum should be in place and we are trying to be the first reunion organization aboard!

  • 2017 Tucson, AZ!

 

ISO
sailors looking for sailors 
(carolebryan.ddg22@msn.com and I will post requests and relay any responses) 

 

 a nice decomm story (editorial comment)

 

I can't remember telling you (but that doesn't mean I didn't) that I was on the decommissioning crew of STODDERT.  I am a retired LDO Lieutenant, but in the early '90s I was a Chief Yeoman assigned as STODDERT's Ship's Secretary.  In fact, I had just been selected for Chief, was initiated and pinned with 3 shipmates in Rodman, Panama in September 1990.   I made the Chief's List in large part due to the first observed evaluation I received from the ship's CO, CDR Dale Onyon,.  He was a good skipper who believed in second chances.  Anyway, fast forward a couple of years to the ship's last days of commissioned service - as the last Ship's Secretary, I was responsible for preparing the transfer paperwork for the remaining officers on board, which was really not that many toward the end.  Eddie McCoy, a Senior Chief Personnel man at that time and now a retired Master Chief, was the ship's Personnel Officer and responsible for all of the enlisted orders.   Finally, the day came when everyone had left with orders in hand except the two people handing the orders out and the ship's last CO:   CDR Ray Arguello, Senior Chief McCoy, and me.  We gathered up our own transfer packages, unceremoniously departed the ship by crossing the brow for the final time, shook hands, exchanged salutes, and went our separate ways - a very somber moment back then that touches me even today.

 

Warm regards and Merry Christmas!

Denny Cox  89-91

 

 

 

 

 Dave Behrend (71-74) ISO sailors residing in Upper Michigan & Wisconsin

Do we have records of shipmates from Upper Michigan in the county's of

Menominee, Alger, Dickinson, Marquette, Delta, Iron.

 

Wisconsin County's

Brown, Fond-Dulac, Oconto, Shawano, Florence, Marinette, Calumet, Outagamie.   

 

 


 I was a MMFN onboard the USS Benjamin Stoddert from 1980-1982 while we were in the shipyard in Pearl Harbor. I worked in the #1 Engine room with MM2 Murphy, MM1 Willie Walker, BT1 Whitlock and several others just cannot remember all the great folks I worked with. CO was Cmdr. Quas I believe. I then had a medical issue and got transferred to shore duty. I got out of the Navy and 1983 returned to my childhood home in Virginia and went to work at Newport News Shipyard working on subs and have work on just about everything in the naval fleet since then. I am currently a Project manager for MHI in-charge of overhauls of DDGs and working with the shipforce my how the Navy has changed. But please keep up the work for the USS Benjamin Stoddert because old folks like me appreciate it. Thanks again.
William (Bill) Palmer

Anthony Ware 89-92 iso James C Cole who worked in OPS around 89-92..Also looking for Keith Belcher (PN3) and last name Cuizon PN3


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